You could steal the Storm's idea if you need a certain level of reliablity.<div><br><div><span style="font-family:'.HelveticaNeueUI';white-space:nowrap"><a href="https://github.com/nathanmarz/storm/wiki/Guaranteeing-message-processing" target="_blank">https://github.com/nathanmarz/storm/wiki/Guaranteeing-message-processing</a></span></div>

<div><font face=".HelveticaNeueUI"><span style="white-space:nowrap"><br></span></font></div><div><font face=".HelveticaNeueUI"><span style="white-space:nowrap">But basically, it would be extremely hard to achive exactly-once messaging without a <span></span>severe performance penalty.</span></font></div>

<div><br></div><div><font face=".HelveticaNeueUI"><span style="white-space:nowrap">Thanks</span></font></div><div><font face=".HelveticaNeueUI"><span style="white-space:nowrap">Min<br>
</span></font><br>2013년 2월 20일 수요일에 Ian Barber님이 작성:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Feb 19, 2013 at 9:07 PM, Pieter Hintjens <span dir="ltr"><<a>ph@imatix.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Yes, events != state. In fact Zyre is already a distributed event bus<br>
that can scale to about 100 peers (from experience) on WiFi, and a bit<br>
more than that on a LAN. Persistence and consistency are quite another<br>
story.<br>
<span><font color="#888888"><br>
-Pieter</font></span></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Tom's Paxos implementation might be of interest to the OP here as well: <a href="https://github.com/cocagne/paxos" target="_blank">https://github.com/cocagne/paxos</a> - layering something like that over the top of zyre might help. Or the post-ordering rotating token algo, treat zyre like a multicast. </div>


<div><br></div><div>Ian </div></div>
</blockquote></div></div>