On 8 April 2010 21:00, Martin Sustrik <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:sustrik@250bpm.com">sustrik@250bpm.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

<div class="im"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
I notice "holes" in packet sequence number at the moment where according to the graph there is no traffic.<br>
Everything looks like some network packet has not been transferred to wireshark. However, these packets has been transmitted on the network otherwise none of my subscribers will have reported a correct transmission.<br>
If some packets have not been transmitted to wireshark, I guess the same things happened for my 4 subscribers which has lost messages.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>As one of my subscriber has received all my messages, I think the network delivered all the messages.<br></blockquote><div><br>Sounds like broken or incorrectly configured hardware.  Try swapping the application roles between hosts to see if the result changes.  Preferably try running pgmping from OpenPGM between the hosts.<br>

<br>I had a lot of problems with a SPARC and STP on the switch port recently.<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im">

<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
If yes, I guess the solution is to decrease the RATE until the kernel is able to reliably dispatch all the packets received to all the involved subscribers.<br>
</blockquote>My kernel is linux 2.6.28-18. Do you think that this multicast packet dispatching done by the kernel could be the reason of the behavior I am observing?<br>
<br></div>
I don't think the rate is problem. By default it's 100kb/sec which is extremely low and the system should experience any problems with it.<br><br></blockquote><div><br>At such a minuscule data rate the kernel is not going have any significant impact.<br>

<br>It is possible the rate is actually so low you keep tripping up the NICs batching and coalescing features, so I'd also give a go at ramping up to something more useful.<br><br>-- <br>Steve-o<br></div></div>